33 Things I Stole From People Smarter Than Me »

I stumbled across another great collection of pieces of life advice. Again, they all are great, but this one for me hits close personally.

“Your last book won’t write your next one.” I don’t remember who said it, but it’s true for writing and for all professions. You are constantly starting at zero. Every sale is a new sale. Every season is a new season. Every fight is a new fight. If you think your past success guarantees you anything, you’re in for a rude awakening. In fact, someone has already started to beat you.

“If you think your past success guarantees you anything, you’re in for a rude awakening.” Wow, that is some fresh humble pie.

I recently separated from my last job, and given my experience in the industry, I figured I wouldn’t have any problems finding new work. It’s been 3 weeks and my phone has been silent and inbox has been empty. I’m still confident I will find something eventually, I just didn’t realize it would take this long.

Eight Secrets to a (Fairly) Fulfilled Life »

I came across a great read, with an admittingly clickbait-y title, but it’s totally worth the click. All eight points are great but this one resonates with me loud and clear.

The solution to imposter syndrome is to see that you are one.

Humanity is divided into two: on the one hand, those who are improvising their way through life, patching solutions together and putting out fires as they go, but deluding themselves otherwise; and on the other, those doing exactly the same, except that they know it.

It was through this same site that I realized that everyone is totally winging it, all the time. Once I learned this, and then now adding this corollary regarding imposter syndrome, I can hopefully put to rest any debilitating fear I have about getting “found out”.

It is also completely ridiculous that when I first introduce myself to customers, I will always throw in, “I don’t know everything, but I’m really good at finding the answer” which is literally the best anyone could ever do at anything, but my mind will always find a way to talk itself into thinking I’m an imposter.

This is a great reminder that everyone is doing the best they can at everything. It’s just that some have been doing it longer.

Sports Are Back »

Professional sports leagues are back into play and the New York Times put together a list of some rule changes that they feel would make the different sports more interesting.

If you own a team that finishes last in the division three years in a row, you and your family must divest entirely.

But the team stays put.

I like this one too.

If leagues can have a salary cap, they can have a concessions cap, too.

Tie ticket and concessions prices to the team’s current record or its last championship. Last place? Your beer is a buck.

Would have made the Chargers’ season last year a lot more fun.

On Facebook »

John Gruber on Anne Borden King’s experience of getting pseudoscience cancer ads after she posted about her breast cancer diagnosis.

They don’t advertise on legitimate media because legitimate media won’t have them, and because Facebook makes it affordable by doing all the hard work of targeting for them. Facebook is a criminal enterprise fully and knowingly complicit in all of this — from the spread of bigotry to the spread of pseudoscience.

Conversely, legitimate advertisers are abandoning Facebook because they want nothing to do with any of this. To remain on Facebook is to be complicit by association.

I deleted my Facebook account at least over a year ago. I am very close to deleting my Instagram account. Facebook is a terrible, horrible corporation.

Why Time Feels So Weird »

The global coronavirus pandemic has heightened our awareness that time is subjective. For some people who enjoy working from home, the days have whizzed by. For others desperate to travel or visit a loved one, time has slowed to a crawl.

I’ve noticed that my sense of time is all messed up since the pandemic started. In the middle of March, when shelter in place was first implemented, the rest of the month took forever. Then April flew by. We’re halfway through July and I can’t believe all of our family’s May birthdays were two months ago. It seems longer.

For those of us with kids, we can relate. There’s a saying, which I’m paraphrasing, “The days are long, but the years are short.” Each day, especially now, seems long with keeping them entertained, fed, and, most of all, healthy and safe. But it’s nuts to see our youngest one is now 5 years old. The passage of time is weird.